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September 14, 2009

Next Meeting Wednesday September 2, Freer Gallery Meyer Auditorium

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Green-glazed sacred goose kendi or ewer made in the Si Satchanalai / Sawankhalok kilns of north-central Thailand in 14th-15th centuries.

The next meeting of the Washington Oriental Ceramic Group will take place on Wednesday, September 30, 2 PM, at the Freer Gallery’s Meyer Auditorium. This meeting is co-sponsored with the Freer and Sackler Galleries.

The presentation is “Thailand’s deep and Diverse Ceramic Traditions”. Our speaker Robert Retka, a former Peace Corps volunteer and Foreign Service Officer, shares his adventures searching for ceramic production sites that were active in the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries. Khmer, Lao, and Thai potters all operated kilns and made ceramics within the borders of modern Thailand. No RSVPs are necessary, just show up.

The image is of a green-glazed sacred goose kendi or ewer made in the Si Satchanalai / Sawankhalok kilns of north-central Thailand in 14th-15th centuries. It is in a private Japanese collection.

Please note the date for the following WOCG meeting is Saturday, 17 October. That session will concentrate on Asian silver. Sylvia Fraser-Lu and Sam Jackson will introduce this topic. The raison d’etre for the meeting, however, is for members to bring their Asian silver acquired over the years, whether it’s from Yemen (West Asia), Cambodia, Nyonya pieces from Malaya, bring them for a show and tell.

A new idea – “From Members’ Collections”

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Porcelain ewer, Southern China, 11th -early 12th century, Freer Collection.

We want to add to the WOCG’s monthly announcement ceramics from members’ collections. If interested, email me a jpeg image and a comment on the piece, i.e., where it was collected, its attraction for you, some background on the type of ware, etc. If not imperial that’s okay. We’d like to hear what turned you on to acquire it. The following is a favorite of mine.

This porcelain ewer covered by a clear bluish-white qingbai glaze was made in southern China in 11th -early 12th century. It is in the Freer collection. It was excavated in Korea from a Koryo dynasty (918-1372) tomb. Such wares were traded extensively throughout Asia and have been found in large numbers in Indonesia and the Philippines.



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